State ranks low in logistics, manufacturing report

New York state ranks low in several categories in a national 2013 manufacturing and logistics report.

The Conexus Indiana 2013 Manufacturing and Logistics National Report has New York state ranking in the lower half of states in five of nine categories. The 2013 report shows how each state ranks among its peers in several areas of the economy that underlie the success of manufacturing and logistics. These specific measures include: manufacturing and logistics industry health, human capital, cost of worker benefits, diversification of the industries, state-level productivity and innovation, expected fiscal liability, tax climate and global reach.

The state received an F in two categories – tax climate and manufacturing industry health. The tax climate category ranked states when it comes to corporate, individual income, sales, unemployment insurance and property taxes. Only four other states also received an F in this category – Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey and Rhode Island.

The manufacturing industry health category judged states on the production of consumer durable and non-durable goods. Data includes the share of manufacturing economy, wage premium and per capita employment. Only four other states received an F -Alaska, Hawaii, Nevada and New Mexico.

New York state also ranked low in global reach with a D+. Global reach ranks states in manufacturing exports per capita, per capita income, export growth, reach of foreign direct investment, foreign direct investment value in manufacturing and demand index data. Thirty-five states had a better grade than New York in global reach.

New York scored a C- in both worker benefit costs and human capital. There were 30 states in the nation that ranked better than New York in both categories. Worker benefit costs ranked states when it comes to health care premiums, health care costs, workers’ compensation rates and federal expenditures. Human capital measured states in education and skill level, health of residents, percent of high school degrees, bachelor’s degrees and associate degrees.

New York ranked well in four categories. The state’s best ranking was a B+ in expected fiscal liability gap. This category ranks states in unfunded liability per capita, percent of gross domestic product, average benefits and bond rankings. Only five states had a better grade: Delaware, Georgia, North Carolina, Utah and Wisconsin.

New York scored its second best grade of a B- in sector diversification. Only 13 states scored a better grade than New York. This category measured states through the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index, which is a method of calculating diversification of industry sectors.

New York scored a C+ in productivity and innovation, with only 16 other states scoring a better grade. Productivity and innovation ranks states in research and development, patents per capita and average productivity.

New York scored a C in logistics industry health. In this category only 18 states scored a better grade. This section ranked states when it comes to transportation and warehouse industry groups that make it possible to store and move goods. The data includes employment per capita, commodity flows by road and rail, share of logistic economy, state infrastructure spending, commodities shipped, and highway infrastructure investment distribution.

The report was done by the Ball State Center for Business and Economic Research. Conexus Indiana is a private sector initiative focused on the advanced manufacturing and logistics sectors. For more information on the manufacturing and logistics report, visit conexus.cberdata.org/files/National2013.pdf.