Disabilities are not always evident

Editor, OBSERVER:

This is to any and all handicapped persons, and those who care about them.

Yesterday my granddaughter and I stopped at a store in Cassadaga to use the rest room after a long drive to Buffalo and back. I parked in the handicap spot in front of the store and put my placard in the window as the law requires.

As we entered the store we were accosted by a very verbally abusive older man asking if either of us was disabled. I told him that I in fact am 100 percent disabled. He called me a liar because I don’t look like it. He yelled at me calling me nasty names and saying I had no right to park where I did and threatened to call the police on me. I invited him to do just that.

I told him that I suffer from a very crippling form of arthritis, Fibromyalgia, gout and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, all of which do not show on the outside. He didn’t seem to care, still calling me a liar.

I just want people to be aware that even though some forms of disability do not show on the outside of a person’s body, that does not mean that they are not in severe pain, have difficulty walking, and coping with everyday functions. So before you judge someone on their outside appearance, give a thought to what they may be suffering on the inside.

By the Grace of God, it could have been you.

ADRIAN MADDEN,

Lakewood