BREAKING NEWS

BREAKING NEWS

Highs and lows: Some of the best, worst of the week

Here are some of the best – and worst – of the week:

BEST

CHRISTMAS IN WESTFIELD – Following Santa’s visit Friday night, the village of Westfield has a number of other happenings this weekend. Today from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. free horse drawn carriage rides will be available in downtown. Shawn Wilder will be performing today and tomorrow. Eason Hall will be open for its “Hall of Christmas.” And don’t forget the annual Holly Tour Sunday, where a number of area houses will be visited. It may not yet be Thanksgiving, but it’s still a fun Christmas celebration to begin the season.

BOWL-ING FOR HUNGER – We applaud the many artists who have volunteered their time to make bowls which will be sold at the Empty Bowls Fundraiser on Dec. 7 in Dunkirk. Last year the fundraiser generated $20,000. The money raised is donated to local food pantries. With the need still great, let’s hope this year is just as successful.

RUNNING SUCCESS – Good job to Fredonia High School senior Michaela Tramuta. She was recently named the Chautauqua-Cattaraugus Athletic Association Cross Country Large School Runner of the Year. We wish her good luck in her future endeavors.

WORST

CVCS BOARD OF EDUCATION – Cassadaga Valley School Board of Education member David Christy wants to know “where everybody’s been.” When the board chose to close the Cassadaga Elementary School, people showed up in droves, but they closed it anyway. They said they couldn’t afford to keep the building open, yet CVCS has the highest paid teachers in Chautauqua County. When the school board decided to eliminate a music teacher and have only one band teacher for fifth to 12 grade, people showed up in droves, but they eliminated the position anyway. They said they couldn’t afford the position, even though the school has two principals for one elementary school. When the high school principal and the board of education came to an “agreement” for her departure, the board stated they couldn’t disclose what the agreement is, even though the agreement was likely financial, which means taxpayers’ money. People in the district care, but too often their concerns fall on deaf ears.